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Greg

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 #1 
water management is the key to cheaper housing by developing inland cities and leaving the Sydney and Melbourne rat race behind us. The housing prices are a political driven scam caused deliberately to enrich the rich, by too much immigration, too little inland development and tax breaks for the landlords. NBN, once it starts working, will make it possible to do many jobs from  a beautiful inland city where housing costs a third of Sydney, the air is cleaner, traffic light cycleways safe and people friendly.
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Greg

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 #2 
let your friends know  this is under discussion and get them involved. Then we can start shaping policy once we determine common objectives
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Barbara1

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 #3 
Absolutely need to compile statistics on water usage all round first....to help plan efficiently.
We need to learn from those other dry countries (as I said before) as they have managed to harness essential supplies for thousands of years). 
Another example is the underground channels we visited in Northwest China (Turpan region) where the water runs down from the mountains at snowmelt and raintimes, through these channels (which were dug thousands of years ago) and are still used today. They have manholes along the way for access and to use buckets to draw water where needed. 
This same practice is evident in Uzbekistan, Kyrgyzstan, Morocco, Greece and Middle eastern regions.  The channels are large enough for humans to walk through too!
We could run pipelines to harness water overflows from our northern rivers when there are huge downpours (as has just occurred in past few weeks up in Nth Qld). Those pipelines could be laid in a southerly or westerly direction to drier regions. NOT ROCKET SCIENCE !
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Greg

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 #4 
Would ocean water desalinated and pumped inland be free of salt when delivered?
What is a fair way to share water? To begin, should we not work out how much water is consumed by each person, cow, sheep, horse, pig, tonne of the various crops including wheat, hay, cotton, fruit trees, rice etc to give us a picture? What do you think?
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Margaret

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 #5 
At least people are realizing that on this planet there is only one serve of water
Unfortunately, the sharing out process has become fraught with vested interests skewing the good intentions. Once it starts to cost these their profits, we might make some progress.
I agree with small scale desal plants along the coast
I put the health of the rivers first and this is best judged by the success of its wildlife. We have had such good indicators of trouble that it seems unbelievable that this has not prompted action.
We must not get lost in arguments about pumping large amounts of the sea or the coastal rivers inland. There are many problems involved including inadvertently raising the saline level in the soil of the recipients.
There must be NO fracking to further imperil our aquifers.
Water hungry crops such as rice, cotton and almonds must be curtailed or, at worst, put on drip feed water as is done so well in the deserts of Israel and the Middle East.
Central Asia has lost the rivers flowing into the Aral Sea by careless old methods of open canals. This has resulted in ruined fisheries and the dislocation of communities. We have the know how, world examples and motivation to do better.
Come on Australia. Save our waterways.
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Barbara1

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 #6 
Growing Almonds to make BIG money, was the main objective of acquiring those water rights.  Already it is obvious that growing water-sucking crops such as almonds and cotton is NOT sustainable in this the driest continent on earth so we need to make it CLEAR to our politicians that these particular agricultural mega industries are NOT acceptable longer term, even if it is a threat to some jobs....already the rice-growing industry around Leeton is decimated with Sunrice having had to reduce employment by hundreds in past several years.

We need to convince the decision makers that we must grow crops using minimal water resources - eg industrial HEMP plus look to the MIDDLE EASTERN countries where they grow sustainable crops in desert regions.

The old ways of using our land are now becoming redundant - or else our agricultural industries will become REDUNDANT with desertification becoming the resultant consequences! (THOSE WHO DO NOT LEARN FROM HISTORY ARE CONDEMNED TO REPEAT IT) - despite new technologies....
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VotersNetwork

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 #7 
Post by Zelda2

Has our Murray Darling river been stolen by private well owners?

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-7780983/Foreign-company-sells-89-billion-litres-Australian-water-rights-490m-drought.html?ito=facebook_share_article-top&fbclid=IwAR2LLt4bOXmpdjbuwVvfP2uJ8n8MSI01JfT4xruKHWHdizburXRs_Be5MeQ

https://theconversation.com/dams-are-being-built-but-they-are-private-australia-institute-124807
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Greg

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 #8 
Bipartisanship is really not on because the parties fight each other for the power, the spoils of war, which government delivers to the winner. Only voter pressure can make them both agree to do what is wanted. If the excess water from  melting ice and small amounts from coastal rivers are pumped inland we will avoid massive flooding and enable food to still be grown. Margaret is right about sticks and carrots so let us think about that. My simple discount for safe drivers on licence renewals only took 1 Votergram. Let us first decide what is the right thing to do and what is the wrong thing. We need to be careful about cutting food production because what comes from some foreign countries where life is cheap is pretty awful eg melamine in milk. We might also stop the Chinese buying up our food production or we might find ourselves under a dictatorship which is a lot worse that our current democracy.
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Margaret

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 #9 
This is a great plan 
however-the whole water thing is so complex  there will be storms on the way to getting this through government.
I'd  like to see an incentive scheme to reward those many rural folk doing the right thing.
How could this work? I guess pointing out how many people now have basic water available thanks to restraint could be incentive enough.
Sticks and carrots is still the best way to present a case. 
The public is sick of negativity. Bi-partisan effort would be a dream.
At what point do you allow irrigation again?  City people and supermarketswill take some persuading when their veggies can't be watered at the moment. It could be done if the right story is presented to the public somehow above the media storm that would ensue.
Such restrictions would remove businesses that are marginal and should never have been encouraged in low rainfall areas.
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Barbara1

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 #10 
Your suggested ban is the only way forward as there is NO rain forecast for many months ahead and it will probably continue to be drier for years to come....the entire planet is now getting MORE EXTREME weather events - for example this November we have incredibly widespread, unprecendented bushfires in NSW & QLD at the same time that the UK is facing extreme Rainfall, snow events and icing over. Also Venice has had extreme flooding !

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Greg

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 #11 

What would you think of a ban on storing any water taken from a river except for household and stock drinking troughs. That would allow stock to drink from waterways or tank fed troughs and farmers to irrigate (drip feed maybe) and farms to pump water for washing, toilets etc but avoid this situation of enormous farm dams pumping rivers dry. Farm dams could be allowed only to store the rain that runs into them from the farm or neighbouring run-off, as applies in most cases now.

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Greg

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 #12 
This discussion is now closed as it has grown into a serious task force discussion on Water Management in Australia. Please put future comments on that topic. Already government is adopting suggestions we have made by Votergram
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Greg

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 #13 
Voter suggestions for a political persuasion campaign to provide Australia with the water it needs for its population, industry and environment. Voters drive politicians then politicians drive government. 
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Greg

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 #14 
Good proposal worked around by Angus and good input by Margaret on how to seriously manage water needs and environmental ones. My view is that all new dams be only for domestic town water supplies and not in any way to be used for irrigation and that good flows be allowed down rivers at the same time as collecting good amounts of water. In times of torrential rain which often happens inland plenty of water can be collected to be used by townspeople when it does not rain. Farms should collect their own run-off. Politicians will never fix this without voter input, any more than they will develop sensible drought plans. They need our input and support.

Let's make it happen voters!!
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Angus1

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 #15 
Happy to be involved.
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