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Bruce

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 #1 
If, Tania, you mean develop industries so as to attract more migrants so that they will demand more accomodation which in turn makes money for developers, then you get no support from me.  Quite the opposite.
This pandemic is causing a lot of us to rethink what we do.  There has always been a need to make us more than just a farm and a mine for the rest of the world, and it has been brought home to us quite strongly that we need to have more manufacturing and innovative skills so that we are not prey to suffering too much when we get international problems thrust on us that are not of our own making.  industries that require high level skills and not necessarily mass production skills is the way to go.  that means investment in education and incentives for inventive people to develop new world industries.  we do have some industries like that, but we need more.  I spent many years in the IT industry and was a member of the Australian Computer Society.  The ACS spent years trying to get the Government to set up initiatives to develop more home grown IT industries with very limited success.  Looking back now i think i can see the reason for that was that there were no votes in it.  the general public were not interested because they were only able to see the employment created by the automobile and mining industries.  There needs to be a groundswell of interest for something specific that will grab the attention of our politicians so that they can see votes in it.  What kinds of industry do you have in mind that would be good for us to push for?
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Tania2

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 #2 
The pandemic has forced the property industry to admit that real estate sales are very reliant on migrants to make big $$ for developers. Australia needs to rebuild a manufacturing and innovation industry.
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Pat1

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 #3 
I am wondering what others feel about a constant prop up and policy to keep industry going like education and building causing a constant need for oversees investment and reliance of international students and international investment in the building industry then requiring migrants to create a demand to prop up the property market instead of investing in more value add industry and a lesser reliance on the merry-go-round to keep going. Why is there a need for skilled migrants.  Is our education system not providing the skills to our existing generation?

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Pat1

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 #4 
https://www.forbes.com/sites/startswithabang/2020/03/17/why-exponential-growth-is-so-scary-for-the-covid-19-coronavirus/#69a7e1054e9b


I believe High density living is a cesspool for viruses.   Now we are forced to practice social isolation and distancing and people will feel like prisoners in their own homes. Perhaps it will give them an understanding of what battery hens feel like.
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VotersNetwork

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Posts: 28
 #5 
Post by Zelda2


Our government is building new cities and rezoning farming land to do so

 

https://architectureau.com/articles/market-led-proposal-could-see-eight-new-cities-across-rural-nsw-and-victoria/

http://www.clara.com.au/

 

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Pat1

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 #6 
Towns are dying from lack of water, people, jobs, business, growth.  Yet here we are building and building in Sydney making it more and more congested with infrastructure never keeping up
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Greg

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 #7 
Those interested in immigration working well and who think this is a good idea, might consider a cap on immigration to no more than our natural increase so that we do not eventually lose control of our Australian culture & traditions.

They might also, if they agree, help urge the government to  require English language basics before immigrating  and a 3 year course in English once here. Ability to communicate with each other seems like a good way to make friends and get on together which can help integration and avoid marginalisation.
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Greg

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 #8 
Thanks Zelda. 

Everyone: We are establishing a taskforce on this topic. Please post that you are happy to join and see how many others you can sign up to it. The more people who are involved the easier it will be to have government do what is required.
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Zelda2

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 #9 
Hi,
so ref immigration they are looking at a new system at end of year. My friend is a visa migration agent. Basically it will mean they wont have a list of sponsored occupations, none. Instead they want to grow the smaller ares and rural towns. So anyone can apply for a visa to work in a full time career in a town or rural area. If they stay there and work for 4 years full time then they can apply for PR. 
Just an update on new changes coming......
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Greg

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 #10 
Sydney residents need to decide whether they want a "Global City" as a cash register for the nation or a "Livable City" for the enjoyment of our families, friends and communities. Global cities come with many tourists, congestion, crime, mental illness and isolation but they deliver billions of dollars to  property developers, bankers and financiers, alcohol and gambling industries which also means jobs for others. 

For those wanting a livable city that welcomes tourists, what do others think of:- a ban on further residential development  in Sydney  for 5 years; development of schools hospitals and shopping centres in at least 10 inland cities with rail and air links between them and with major cities; Tax concessions of 50% for people and businesses who move to regional Australia and remain there for 5 years; removal of stamp duty on transfer of homes in inland Australia; transfer of at least half of the government offices from capital cities to inland Australia; negative gearing to only apply in future to properties in inland Australia; immigrants welcome if they are happy to help develop inland Australia; affordable housing to be constructed in inland cities where land really is affordable. That would stimulate our flagging economy!

You don't have to agree. Residents of Sydney CAN have an effective say on this issue, whatever their view, by Votergram into state and federal parliament as well as on this forum. All opinions welcome and respected.

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Pat1

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 #11 
https://www.smhpopulation.com.au/

Here is a Forum on the 23rd of September 2019 at $900 a pop.  How many of those affected will be able to afford to go? Every day the average Australian spends hours in traffic or on overcrowded public transport and they call it livable cities.


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Bruce

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 #12 
Maybe the first step is to ensure that for a minimum of 5 or 10 years the heads of the departments are guaranteed not to be moved from the current location. Then only those who follow them have to go to the decentralised location to do the HOD jobs.



Bruce

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Angus1

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 #13 
     What I would say now is an addendum to my comments on this subject of 25 Sept '18. And it relates to the much maligned Gough Whitlam, who having been out of office for so long, was keen to introduce a whole raft of progressive legislation - one of which was decentrlisation.
     Much of that govts. efforts fell by the wayside, but a few remain, such as the Mapping Authority in Bathurst. But the biggest problem Whitlam faced was not having staff, infrastructure, accommodation etc. but the sheer intransigence of the very top people in the Govt. departments that were scheduled to be relocated. Being(relatively) powerful people in the public sector, they lobbied, dragged their feet, impeded, and did enough damage that the entire scheme never eventuated. Such a shame.
     So what can be learnt from this 1970's initiative ?  Whitlam, as I state was in a hurry to introduce the legislation he wanted as quickly as he could, and this was the basic problem. With any new move in this direction, the first (not the last) matter is to involve the heads of Dept's and their senior people where the aim is to decentralise such dept. This may take many months, and involve costs - such as providing accommodation and sightseeing over several weeks, so that these people can see that country cities have a pleasant lifestyle (at least when they have some water).  And much, much more.
     What I'm saying may or may not be realised by the current crop of idio, sorry federal politicians, who may not even remember the Whitlam days, or were just too young. Any lobbying that Voters.Network does, should emphasise this little piece of history, and what can be learnt from it.

 
 
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Greg

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 #14 
The Federal Government is being asked to fund massive transport infrastructure like underground tunnels. How inexpensive would it be to develop cities like, in NSW,  Wagga, Orange, Tamworth, Armidale at a tiny fraction of the cost; move government department there with schools and hospitals and give  10 year tax breaks to those moving there from capital cities.  Transport corridors are cheap there. Now is the time to do it.
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Bruce

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 #15 
i firmly believe that the congestion problems, high density living and eventually the growth of inner city crime will be much alleviated by developing the non-capital city areas [decentralisation].  This would take the pressure off roads around the capital cities; give people more time with families; boost the economies of the country towns; reduce the need for more water supplies for the city; slow down the reduction of productive farmland  east of the divide, and generally be good for our living styles and the economy of Australia.  it would be one of the biggest benefits to us as a nation.  it needs us to pester our MPs both state and federal to take action on this by doing things such as financial incentives for business to move out the the Sydney/Melbourne/Brisbane areas and into the remoter communities. 
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